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New York eats

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In the Bronx, Jamaican Patties That Are ‘Worth the Wait’

Via Emon Hassan for The New York Times

Bakers work in two shifts; batches of chicken and vegetable patties are made in the morning, while the beef patties are made in the afternoon. Although Ms. Sinclair declined to disclose how many patties are produced daily, she said all of them were handmade using fresh ingredients like thyme and Jamaican scotch bonnet peppers. And she said they were never frozen.

Read on at The New York Times.

A Shop Devoted to Safe-to-Eat Raw Cookie Dough Is Opening in New York Next Week

Via Melissa Horn
Via Melissa Hom

DO (pronounced dough) is terrible news for anyone whose only obstacle to gorging on raw cookie dough is the FDA’s warning against eating uncooked eggs and flour. Founder Kristen Tomlan found a way to render the stuff harmless, with a pasteurized-egg product and heat-treated flour, and launched an online company that celebrates proto-cookie goop in every imaginable form: scooped into cups and cones, flattened and frozen into “cookies” for ice-cream “sanDOwiches,” half-baked into brownies, and folded into Blue Marble ice cream for sundaes and milkshakes. Next week, she’ll open a Greenwich Village showcase for it with 15 seats, Toby’s Estate coffee, and a case full of prepacked flavors like chocolate chip, cake batter, and confetti. Take a look at some of the confections and the space.

Read on at Grub Street.

5 of Our Favorite Inwood Breakfast Spots

Via Indian Road Cafe
Via Indian Road Cafe

Jazz brunches, old-school bakeries, stacks of blueberry pancakes—good things come to those uptown. At the tip of Manhattan, Inwood is the city’s northernmost neighborhood, which is just fine for its residents that want to keep it to themselves. Green spaces abound, the pace is slow, the vibe is casual and cozy and breakfast options are aplenty. Whether you want to head uptown for long leisurely, or need a place that welcomes freelancers seeking strong coffee, Inwood has a breakfast spot for you.

Read on at Food Tank.

12 Excellent Things to Eat, Drink, and Do in December

Via  Liz Clayman
Via Liz Clayman

Every month in New York, there’s bound to be a bewildering number of new dishes to eat, drinks to imbibe, and food-themed events to attend. It would be impossible to pack in every single thing each month, and the hardest part often is just figuring out what’s really worth your limited time. So Grub kicks off each month with a curated collection of dishes, drinks, and events that should absolutely be on your agenda. Make your plans now.

Read on at Grubstreet.

What to Try When Dig Inn Debuts Its New Breakfast Program

Via Facebook/Dig Inn
Via Facebook/Dig Inn

Dig Inn, the farm-to-counter favorite—admit it, you’ve stood in the long lines to grab a salad at lunch or the seasonal upstate mac for dinner—is about to debut its new breakfast program.

“Lunch and dinner has been all the rage in the ‘fast casual’ space over the past few years, but no one seemed to be doing anything special with breakfast,” Founder and CEO Adam Eskin said. “It seemed like an obvious opportunity to do something really special that had yet to be done, and bring our veggie-centric approach to the breakfast game—a meal that people really love, but often struggle to find what suits them.”

Read on at Edible Manhattan.

12 Super-Exciting Things You Have to Eat, Drink, and Do in September

Via Melissa Hom
Via Melissa Hom

It’s pretty much guaranteed that every month in New York offers a bewildering number of new dishes to eat, drinks to imbibe, and food-themed events to attend. It would be impossible to pack in every single thing each month, and the hardest part often is just figuring out what to do with your limited time. So Grub has decided to kick off the month with a short but sweet list of dishes, drinks, and events that should absolutely be on your agenda. Make your plans now.

Eat and explore over at Grub Street.

A Guide to Harlem’s New Wave of African Restaurants

Via Bobby Doherty/New York Magazine

Harlem’s African-restaurant scene has been fairly insular, mainly attracting immigrants homesick for their native dishes. And as upper Manhattan continues to gentrify, beloved neighborhood spots clustered around 116thStreet’s “Little Senegal” have been displaced. The good news is that several have reopened nearby, joined by newcomers serving food beyond West African, from places like Somalia and Ethiopia. And the appeal of these diverse cuisines has begun to grow outside immigrant enclaves as American chefs like Sean Brock of Husk in Charleston and the Cecil’s Joseph “JJ” Johnson take inspiration from the African diaspora and the aftermath of the slave trade on foodways and culinary traditions throughout the world. 

Read on at Grub Street.