Tag Archives: featured
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TIE Story of the Month: ‘Foodie Cultured’, by Anju Treohan

     For their first date, they met for happy hour. Ben suggested Inde Blu, a classy little restaurant with an Indian inspired—not fusion—menu. Sonia thought it was kind of cute, like– Oh! He’s picking an Indian restaurant because I’m Indian. She didn’t call him out on it. She told him it was a great […]

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‘Consider The Apple’, by Kate Angus

Consider the Apple And its many names      Akero: pale green strewn with white like light snow dusting leaves. Ambrosia. Annurca: the oldest, depicted in tiled frescoes beneath Herculaneum’s ashes. Arkansas Black hangs as coal in the trees. Ballyfatten, Belle de Boskoop, Bloody Ploughman. Carter’s Blue like the winter sky in cloud-heavy bloom. The […]

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Grace Bonney, second from left, receives a welcome donation.

March Market Report, By Stacey Harwood-Lehman

Have you heard the one about the man who wanted to win the lottery? Every week he went to synagogue to pray. “God,” he said, “I know I haven’t been perfect but I really need to win the lottery! Please help me out.” A week went by and he hadn’t won the lottery so he […]

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Zero Waste Food Conference

  Please join us for Zero Waste Food on April 28th & 29th! Through panel discussions on sustainable kitchen design, creating new connections in the food chain, repurposing of materials and reuse of food waste, leaders in the field will discuss their best practices and how they are making changes. Cooking demonstrations and lectures by […]

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TIE Poet of the Month: ‘Self-Portrait: As Harpy’, by Kate Angus

Bird-bodied, women-headed and so hungry: the food that spills over pendulous breasts, the wine that stains belly-fat, vulva. The crease, the folds, the flesh of it. The red of it too. Who could love you, hideous? Who could desire claws that clutch hair that seeps lank breath rancid And so noisy—always talking shrieking singing if […]

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In The Panhandle, by Keri Smith

The frozen crab legs and artichoke dip and french fries. Endless chardonnay on the porch at dusk and a cigar and my step mom sneaking off to call her daughter, who she never speaks about. The pool, unused and warm, the sound of frogs calling out around the yard and the ocean, a few blocks […]

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TIE: Poet of the Month: ‘Never In My Life,’ by Kate Angus

have I eaten so much sugar as in Cuba: profligate blizzard thrown over churros warm from their oil bath, now wrapped safe as babies in brown paper blankets. Glamorous Old Hollywood starlet sparkle of sweet diamonds spackled over the fruit (guava, papaya, words thick on the tongue, as if language were edible). Pulped from the […]

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TIE Poet of the Month: ‘February Is An Early Spring’, by Kate Angus

If I slept like an egg (unbroken), my eyes opening crack the shell. This morning, a cloud formation takes the shape of Great Britain; elsewhere, a garage floods, recedes, and America stains concrete. This is a compulsion called cartocacoethes where one sees maps everywhere. I found the website, and now left-over breakfast toast is Cuba, […]

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Love’s Banquet, by David Lehman

If poetry is love’s banquet, with minstrels reciting tales of cities sacked and sea voyages wrecked while the princely hosts and their guests lift their sacramental chalices and sip the liqueurs of contentment, Play on, not to the sensual ear but to the spirit ditties of no tone. Play on, if music be the food […]

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TIE Story Of The Month: ‘The Separation of Things’, by Chelsea Wolf

When he left, he took the ketchup. I remember looking at it lying on top of a box filled with assorted condiments and packages of Rice-A-Roni and Mac & Cheese. We had bought it at Trader Joe’s the month before. It wasn’t even good ketchup. Not like the specialty eel sauce. This he took. Or […]

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