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TIE Poet of the Month: ‘Reasons to Love NYC’, by Leah Umansky

1. the surprising kindness of strangers 2. the smell of those sugared holiday peanuts & cashews 3. the first snowfall 4. when you make the closing subway door 5. coffee everywhere 6. the whirl of the radiator 7. a juicy cheeseburger 8. eavesdropping 9. knowing everyone around you has their own drama 10. that moment […]

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TIE Poet of the Month: ‘Hunger’, by Leah Umansky

We all live in loops, nightmaring and wilding our own narratives. It is no high-fantasy, but we invent our sparks. Yesterday, I walked the loop of the Central Park Reservoir. I entered from the west side. This December, is another stubborn fall. Nothing lets. Nothing lets go: the reds and golds and greens. [And why […]

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TIE Poet of the Month: ‘Stock’, by Tess Taylor

What I love: rough cut onion. Splitting a rooty carrot late in the kitchen. Tossing in sprouted garlic, one blind potato, the wayward lovage from our autumn garden. Salt. Bay. Chicken carcass & spare drumstick roasting. Assemblage of what is nearly garbage, hacked open for flavor— nothing for view. All at the vestige. Softening cells […]

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TIE Poet of the Month: ‘Poem For Heartbreak’, by Tess Taylor

On the morning of my sorrow I soak the beans. In the face of grief separate stems from the garden chard. Admire purple veins in the silvery collard. I wash away the particulate dirt. Mineral earth glitters in the basin. There are horrors to take in today, but before I do I will peel sweet […]

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TIE Poet of the Month: ‘Parable With Figs’, by Tess Taylor

How in this light Anya emails the listserv: Too many figs: Come and take. On her porch, weathering bags. Inside, ripe stars: Dark puckers, O. The pears need eating today says Carl at the farm-stand, stuffing soft fists in my sack. In the hot hour at the end of a market we used to give […]

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How to Prepare Bear, by Laura Budofsky Wisniewski

As soon as you’ve taken her down skin her. That hide holds heat. You’ll be tempted to wrap yourself in her. Don’t. Cool the carcass fast. Every minute counts. Butcher her conventionally: chops, steaks, roasts, shoulders, rump. Let’s talk flavor. If she feasted on acorns, apples, reships, wild grape, black walnut, if she drank upstream, […]

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TIE Poet of the Month: ‘Commitment’, by Henry Israeli

So difficult to fall asleep, so difficult to wake up. For each you must fully commit. Children used to play jacks sitting on a curb in the street. Now they stare at a rectangle of light with such commitment they look like they are praying. Money is committed to endlessly being passed hand to hand. […]

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TIE Poet of the Month: ‘Book of Shoulds’, by Henry Israeli

A snail never trusts its surroundings so is always moving somewhere until it ends up in a pot with butter. Is that how you imagine the passage of time, your life a slimy trail leading to a burning hot pan? It feels like 100 degrees out there today. The sun is clearly trying to warn […]

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TIE Poet of the Month: ‘Blue Orchid’, by Henry Israeli

They say that if you eat the petals of a blue orchid you will become as beautiful and fragile as a blue orchid. I have crawled through one of the many windows that surround the rich blue heart of the blue orchid and I have found inside of her a blue bed strewn with scraps […]

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TIE Poet of the Month: ‘Names for Figs in Northern Morocco’, Dave Snyder

mad, the foreigner, skin, like an almond, with a neck, with a beard, streaked, denuded, somebody equivocal, thin measure of gold, old gold coin, that grows spontaneously. Source: Hmimsa, Y, Y. Aumeeruddy-Thomas, M. Ater. Vernacular Taxonomy, Classification and Varietal Diversity of fig (Ficus carica L.) Among Jbala cultivators in Northern Morocco Human Ecology (2012) 40:301–313. […]

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