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TIE Poet of the Month: ‘The Feast,’ Part Four, by Catherine Bowman

The month of May brings us a poem of the month as well as a poet of the month—enjoy The Feast, a poem in four parts, one bite at a time.


4. Winter

In my animal half of my centaur,
in my fox-light after my scent,
I dream toward my sea
where dwells at your center
the perfect riddle
I love to answer
with your expanse.

Mockingbird, fire—

What lives in the nautilus—

Twice unfathomed.

quarry8x_1Catherine Bowman is the award-winning author of 1-8OO-HOT-RIBS, Rock Farm, Notarikon, The Plath Cabinet, and most recently Can I Finish, Please? She also edited Word of Mouth: Poems featured on NPR’sAll Things Considered. Her poems have appeared inThe New Yorker, Ploughshares, The Paris Review, The LA Times and Best American Poetry among other journals. She lives on a farm and teaches literature, writing, and poetry at Indiana University.​

feature image via Wikimedia Commons.

TIE Poet of the Month: ‘The Feast,’ Part Three, by Catherine Bowman

The month of May brings us a poem of the month as well as a poet of the month—enjoy The Feast, a poem in four parts, one bite at a time.


3. South Texas Fall

95 in the shade—
Late afternoon,
swimming through
the Frio river.

Cold cold river—

He’s gone.

He’s gone.

Took off on a cross-stitch
of light, his jeweled tarmac,
his liquid Eucharist,
aromatics of juniper and citrus—
wrapped in light scrolls
and laminate shallows,
down the river he swam,
following a horse.

Giddy up,

pony.

Giddy up.

No one but me here and the armadillos.
Armadillo, this is the season of decay
where sprits rise at dusk and turn
everything into a song inside a song.

Floating on my back, on this day
of the fist ripe grain, I could be
a squash vine or a berry
the devil may or may not like.

And the sky, not the color of a jay feather
but the color of dried corn husk,
if corn husk were blue. Yes, that color.
And, always, the giant Cypress on the bank.

And when we were together,
Cypress tree,

a song

inside

a

song.

quarry8x_1Catherine Bowman is the award-winning author of 1-8OO-HOT-RIBS, Rock Farm, Notarikon, The Plath Cabinet, and most recently Can I Finish, Please? She also edited Word of Mouth: Poems featured on NPR’sAll Things Considered. Her poems have appeared inThe New Yorker, Ploughshares, The Paris Review, The LA Times and Best American Poetry among other journals. She lives on a farm and teaches literature, writing, and poetry at Indiana University.​

feature image via Wikipedia.

Food Loves Tech is Happening June 10th-12th

Screen Shot 2016-05-18 at 8.56.57 AM

Food Loves Tech (FLT), a first-of-its-kind innovation expo created by Edible Manhattan and VaynerLive, in partnership with Audi, will take place June 10-12, 2016, in the heart of Manhattan. FLT’s large-scale daytime immersive installation, under the creative direction of food futurist Dr. Irwin Adam Eydelnant and built by experience design partner ICRAVE, will span the entire block of 27th Street in The Waterfront event space between Eleventh and Twelfth Avenue. Attendees will navigate their way through the field into the city, into the home, and on to the horizon as they see, touch, taste and smell how technologies are changing our future. Curatorial advisors on the inaugural program include Ashley Quinn, Ben Leventhal, Brian Frank, Isha Datar, Marcus Samuelsson, Nico Fonseca and Richie Farina.

Read more about the event on Edible Manhattan.

TIE Poet of the Month: ‘The Feast,’ Part Two, by Catherine Bowman

The month of May brings us a poem of the month as well as a poet of the month—enjoy The Feast, a poem in four parts, one bite at a time.


2. Late summer

You cried. And now you’re here to eat.
10 minutes ago and for how many days
in between, your world lowered
fell beyond your reach. East reversed West.

For right now, without explanation or reason,
you turned right instead of left. And you’re here.
See how these good shoes have learned to carry your feet.

On the porch a hummingbird at work
over a favorite flower.

The blue-green leaves of live oak, sun rose,
and what I think might be yarrow.

Before you a bowl of rice soaked in broth,
salmon, roasted meats. And after
all we were made for.

Just this morning you weren’t sure of anything.
Now, you can only think of how hungry you are.

Outside, the scent of ferns dying, twilight—
A glass of bitters. Wild garlic. Wild sorrow. Appetite.

quarry8x_1Catherine Bowman is the award-winning author of 1-8OO-HOT-RIBS, Rock Farm, Notarikon, The Plath Cabinet, and most recently Can I Finish, Please? She also edited Word of Mouth: Poems featured on NPR’sAll Things Considered. Her poems have appeared inThe New Yorker, Ploughshares, The Paris Review, The LA Times and Best American Poetry among other journals. She lives on a farm and teaches literature, writing, and poetry at Indiana University.​

feature image via Time.

Libya’s Newest Cafés, Because People Want To Live

libya-café

In the best of times, opening a new restaurant is risky. But doing it in Libya – where political conflict and economic crisis have reigned since dictator Moammar Gadhafi was toppled in 2011 — takes true courage.

Yet, the ongoing instability in Libya is exactly why Abdelmuttaleb Twigiri has set up shop in the capital city of Tripoli. In April, he opened his Toucan restaurant, which he calls a “piece of heaven” with stunning views of the Mediterranean. Diners are surrounded by greenery and look out at date palms planted to replace a wall built by Gadhafi’s sons to block access to the beach. The menu offers a mix of Italian and Lebanese dishes.

Twigiri says people need places like his “to change the mood, the way of life. People want to go out. They want to dress up, they need to live,” he tells Morning Edition host Renee Montagne.

Read the rest on The Salt.

‘Recipes’ by Jake Adler

dump spicy meat, corn, chili beans

and shredded cheddar into

cheap tortillas and serve with

many beers to cook and be

not just one of the guys but

their hero too


crust salmon in lemon and cheese

in an oven and then make brown rice

a bit crunchy with asparagus gone limp

in a teriyaki broth and serve with

a chilled white to imply domestic

sensibilities and sex


unwrap a modest candy bar

crack into a small bag of

M&Ms and serve with a lot

of cocaine and cigarettes in a room

alone to induce a healthy panic

and sweat out all fear


make a blue box of mac and cheese

bake frozen fish sticks and heat a

can of peas on the stove in butter and serve

on a tray in front of the television to

feel like mom never died

and sleep heavily


spread crunchy peanut butter and

grape jelly over toasted wheat bread

slice in two and pour a mountain of goldfish crackers

between the two halves and serve with

apple juice in a glass bottle to have

the spunk of an eleven-year old without coffee


take Thursday off

order the benedict and orange juice for two for one

at an empty and bougie bruncherie

eat almost all of it to breathe easier and remember

why you moved here and why you need to leave

linger and tip big


AdlerJake Adler teaches kids at a private school in Brooklyn and is an MFA student of poetry at The New School. His debut chapbook, Calcutta Bang Bang (The Paper Knife, 2015), was published after a year of living in Kolkata, India on a Fulbright grant.

feature image via Chowhound

TIE Poet of The Month: ‘The Feast,’ by Catherine Bowman

The month of May brings us a poem of the month as well as a poet of the month—enjoy The Feast, a poem in four parts, one bite at a time.


1. Early Spring

Here we are, far away from the library
of want, the documented recordings
of debate and appetite, the archive
of 10,000 textures. Far from storms
labeled and qualified, every variety of prairie
lightening boxed, rain categorized, charted
rhino to pale blue egg, the four by five
swatches alphabetized into treasury.
So that we find ourselves at daybreak
in the unnamable field, walking first
along the marshland, then to an open
shoreline in spring’s same old same old world.

Two horseshoe crabs mate, become
something else in the slow tidal wash.
Rabbits, flowers, seabirds and wind
intertwine into what cannot be
contained. The sea grass sways
with the sea clouds in time—
The clouds above all sinew
and hallelujah—This is desire.
But you won’t find it listed
In the compendiums
of sighs, blows, and whispers.

O no you won’t

find it

O no you

won’t

find it.


quarry8x_1Catherine Bowman is the award-winning author of 1-8OO-HOT-RIBS, Rock Farm, Notarikon, The Plath Cabinet, and most recently Can I Finish, Please? She also edited Word of Mouth: Poems featured on NPR’s All Things Considered. Her poems have appeared in The New Yorker, Ploughshares, The Paris Review, The LA Times and Best American Poetry among other journals. She lives on a farm and teaches literature, writing, and poetry at Indiana University.​

feature image via Wired.

Welcome To The Beer Farm

perspephone-exterior

Something tasty is brewing in the village of Gibsons on the Sunshine Coast, a 40-minute ferry ride from Vancouver, British Columbia. Maybe it’s Persephone Brewing Company’s caramel-meets-pine Hop Yard Red Ale, or its Double IPA, which packs a pleasingly bitter punch. It depends on the hops—some of which, conveniently and sustainably, are grown right on site.

Welcome to “The Beer Farm.”

Persephone’s 11-acre plot is home to its craft micro-brewery and tasting room hidden inside a red barn-like building. Outside, hens poke around in their pen. An Airstream trailer that doubles asFarm to Feast’s food truck is parked in front of a pizza oven. On a stretch of land just steps away, spindly wooden poles are interlaced with zig-zagging cables and hundreds of feet of twine, like some new-age string art project. This is one of two hop yards on the farm.

Read the rest on Modern Farmer.

What Is a Detroit Coney Dog?

redhotsconeyisland

The coney dog is a variation on the classic American hot dog; its distinguishing characteristic is a chili topping (generally referred to as coney sauce). Roadfood founders and culinary road trip warriors Jane and Michael Stern explained their affinity for the coney dog in their 2009 book 500 Things to Eat Before It’s Too Late: “These are not aristocratic sausages like you find on the other side of Lake Michigan, in Chicago and Milwaukee. Far from it: they are cheap tasting. But we mean that with all respect; when the craving strikes for a brace of them, no prime filet mignon can satisfy it.”

The term “coneys” is used to refer to the dogs themselves and also serves as shorthand for the type of restaurants in which they’re commonly served, which are ubiquitous in Detroit. So-called “coney islands” are typically Greek-American owned diners that in addition to coney dogs, also serve an eclectic menu with everything from gyros and Greek salad to burgers and breakfast plates.

Read the rest on Eater.

France Temporarily Bans Foie Gras Due to H5N1

Photo by H. Alexander Talbot, via Munchies
Photo by H. Alexander Talbot, via Munchies

Every year, the country force-feeds approximately 38 millions ducks and geese to provide20,000 tonnes, or 75 percent of the world’s supply, of foie gras. But, as of this week, those staggeringly high production numbers are about to take a hit, as French authorities begin to impose an outright ban of foie gras production in the southwestern part of the country.

France being France, however, it’s not banning foie gras production for the same reasons aseveryone else—namely the practice of shoving food into the bellies of birds with a long, metal tube, which is considered an act of animal cruelty by most animal rights groups.

Instead, the prohibition comes amid reports late last year that the H5N1 virus, which is potentially lethal to both humans and birds, had been found at a chicken farm in the region. As a result, not one ounce of it will be produced in 18 of France’s 101 administrative départments, according to Le Figaro newspaper. And, needless to say, the foie gras ban will have broad repercussions not just for consumers, but producers as well.

Read the rest on Munchies.